Vallejo Acrylic Artist Color is manufactured with the best available pigments for artists in a color range of maximum stability and highest degree of light fastness. The pigments, organic and inorganic – such as cadmium, cobalt, quinacridones and pyrroles – are dispersed in a 100% acrylic polymer emulsion. The colors do not contain additives (neither fillers nor matting agents), and dry to a  brilliant, satin, or matt finish depending on the pigment. Acrylic Artist Color has a thick and creamy consistency, (so called “heavy-body”) and maintains the textures and volumes created with brush or spatula; they dry with a minimal alteration of color (no “color shift”) during transition from humid to dry, leaving a film of excellent adhesion, flexibility and resistance.
All colors are water-resistant, non-yellowing, and UV resistant and conform to the European Security Regulations and Environmental Standards of the REACH Protocol and to the U.S.A. certification ASTM D-4236 (No Health Label Required).

categoría
  • 16.515

    Primrose Cadmium Yellow


    Color: Primrose Cadmium Yellow
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY35
    Pigment description: Cadmium-Zinc Sulfide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77205
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.401

    Hansa Yellow


    Color: Hansa Yellow
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3
    Pigment description: Arylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Synthetic organic
    Color Index Number: 11710
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.505

    Titanium Yellow


    Color: Titanium Yellow
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY53
    Pigment description: Oxides of Nickel, Antimony and Titanium
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77788
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.501

    Cadmium Lemon Yellow


    Color: Cadmium Lemon Yellow
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY35
    Pigment description: Cadmium Zinc-Sulfide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77205
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.517

    Cadmium Yellow Medium


    Color: Cadmium Yellow Medium
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY35
    Pigment description: Cadmium-Zinc Sulfide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77205
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.417

    Naples Yellow (Hue)


    Color: Naples Yellow (Hue)
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PO20, PW6, PY42
    Pigment description: Cadmium Sulphoselenide, Rutile Titanium Dioxide, Synthetic Iron Oxide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.422

    Cobalt Yellow (Hue)


    Color: Cobalt Yellow (Hue)
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3, PY42
    Pigment description: Arylide, Synthetic Iron Oxide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.812

    Cobalt Yellow


    Color: Cobalt Yellow
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY40
    Pigment description: Potassium Cobalt Nitrite
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77357
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.820

    Niquel Azo Yellow


    Color: Nickel Azo Yellow
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Transparent
    Pigment: PY150
    Pigment description: Nickel Complex Azo
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic organic
    Color Index Number: 12764
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.315

    Umbleached Titanium


    Color: Unbleached Titanium
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6
    Pigment description: Rutile Titanium Dioxide (Untreated)
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77891
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.316

    Flesh Tint


    Color: Flesh Tint
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6, PO20, PR108
    Pigment description: Rutile Titanium Dioxide, Cadmium Sulphoselenide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.502

    Cadmium Orange Light


    Color: Cadmium Orange Light
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PO20
    Pigment description: Cadmium Sulphoselenide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77202
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.414

    Transparent Orange


    Color: Transparent Orange
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Transparent
    Pigment: PY83
    Pigment description: Diarylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic organic
    Color Index Number: 21108
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.821

    Pyrrole Orange


    Color: Pyrrole Orange
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PO73
    Pigment description: Dipyrrolopyrrol
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic organic
    Color Index Number: 561170
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.803

    Cadmium Orange


    Color: Cadmium Orange
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PO20
    Pigment description: Cadmium Sulphoselenide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77202
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.509

    Vermilion (Hue)


    Color: Vermilion (Hue)
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR112, PW6, PY3
    Pigment description: Naphthol AS, Rutile Titanium Dioxide, Yellow Arylide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.822

    Pyrrole Red


    Color: Pyrrole Red
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR254
    Pigment description: Pyrrolopyrrol
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic organic
    Color Index Number: 56110
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 16.806

    Cadmium Red Light


    Color: Cadmium Red Light
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PO20
    Pigment description: Cadmium Sulphoselenide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77202
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 20.000 – 25.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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