The range of Acrylic Studio has been created with a careful selection of permanent artist pigments chosen for their maximum stability and highest degree of light fastness, dispersed in a 100% acrylic polymer emulsion. In the formulation of this range, pigments derived from heavy metals have been avoided, and all additives considered as fillers have been eliminated, excepting a matting agent employed so that all colors dry to an even, satin finish. The colors have a thick and creamy consistency, and a viscosity of 15.000 to 20.000 cPs: they maintain the brushstrokes and volumes created with a spatula and dry to a film of excellent adhesion, flexibility and strength; waterproof, non-yellowing and resistant to ultraviolet light. The range is complemented by a selection of special colors; metallic, fluorescent and incandescent. All colors can be mixed and combined with our acrylic mediums and textures.
Acrylic Studio colors conform to the European Security Regulations and Environmental Standards of the REACH Protocol and to the U.S.A. certification ASTM D-4236 (No Health Label Required). For more information please consult the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) at the Vallejo website.

categoría
  • 22.011

    Titanium White Rutile


    Color: Titanium White Rutile
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6
    Pigment description: Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic Inorganic
    Color Index Number: 77891
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.041

    Titanium White Anatase


    Color: Titanium White Anatase
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6
    Pigment description: Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification:
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.042

    Titan Buff (Unbleached Titanium)


    Color: Titan Buff (Unbleached Titanium)
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6
    Pigment description: Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification:
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.001

    Cadmium Lemon Yellow (Hue)


    Color: Cadmium Lemon Yellow (Hue)
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3
    Pigment description: Arylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Synthetic Organic
    Color Index Number: 11710
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.043

    Cadmium Yellow Light (Hue)


    Color: Cadmium Yellow Light (Hue)
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3, PY83
    Pigment description: Arylide Yellow, Diarylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.022

    Cadmium Yellow Deep (Hue)


    Color: Cadminum Yellow Deep (Hue)
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3, PY83
    Pigment description: Arylide Yellow, Diarylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.060

    Cadmium Yellow (Hue)


    Color: Cadmium Yellow (Hue)
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY3, PY83, PW6
    Pigment description: Arylide Yellow, Diarylide Yellow, Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.013

    Azo Yellow Orange


    Color: Azo Yellow Orange
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Transparent
    Pigment: PY83
    Pigment description: Diarylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Synthetic Organic
    Color Index Number: 21108
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.021

    Naples Yellow


    Color: Naples Yellow
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PY83, PW6, PY42
    Pigment description: Diarylide Yellow, Titanium Dioxide Rutile, Synthetic Iron Oxide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.044

    Carnation Pink


    Color: Carnation Pink
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PW6, PR112, PY3
    Pigment description: Titanium Dioxide Rutile, Naphthol As-D, Arylide Yellow
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.015

    Orange


    Color: Orange
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Semi-transparent
    Pigment: PY3, PR112
    Pigment description: Naphthol
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.061

    Venetian Red


    Color: Venetian Red
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR112, PR101, PY83, PW6
    Pigment description: Naphthol AS-D, Synthetic Red Iron Oxide, Diarylide Yellow, Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.002

    Cadmium Red (Hue)


    Color: Cadmium Red (Hue)
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR112
    Pigment description: Naphthol AS-D
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Synthetic Organic
    Color Index Number: 12370
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.045

    Dark Cadmium Red (Hue)


    Color: Dark Cadmium Red (Hue)
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR112, PR101, PY83
    Pigment description: Naphthol AS-D, Synthetic Red Iron Oxide
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.003

    Naphthol Crimson


    Color: Naphthol Crimsom
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR146
    Pigment description: Naphthol
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness:
    Pigment classification: Synthetic Organic
    Color Index Number: 12485
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.026

    Rose Madder


    Color: Rose Madder
    Permanence: A
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR5, PV23
    Pigment description: Naphthol ITR, Carbazole Dioxazine
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: II
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.053

    Quinacridone Rose


    Color: Quinacridone Rose
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PV19, PW6
    Pigment description: Quinacridone, Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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  • 22.057

    Rose Red Azo


    Color: Rose Red Azo
    Permanence: AA
    Opacity: Opaque
    Pigment: PR146, PR112, PW6
    Pigment description: Naphthol, Quinacridone, Titanium Dioxide Rutile
    ASTM Rating Ligthfastness: I
    Pigment classification: Mixture
    Color Index Number:
    Viscosity range (mPa.s): 15.000 – 20.000

    Color Index
    The pigments used for artists’ colors are inorganic as well as organic. The inorganic pigments have been used since antiquity; most of them are extracted from minerals and soil, such as natural earth colors, siennas and ocres. Titanium, carbon and ultramarine pigments also belong to this category, as well as cobalt and cadmium. Many of these pigments are now also manufactured synthetically. Organic pigments have their origins in the 19th century. Industrial production developed at the beginning of the twentieth century owing to new manufacturing processes in organic chemistry. These synthetic pigments have become an important group in the manufacture of artists’ colors, producing bright and luminous shades of great intensity and excellent light fastness and permanence. The range has extended continuously, and now besides the familiar phtalocyanines and naphthols, includes azo compounds, dioxacines and pyrroles, antraquiniones and quinacridones.


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